Tuesday, March 4, 2014

More 1 AM madness

I woke up again at 1 AM. There was no dream this time - just a game. A co-worker threw out ideas for a game a few weeks ago and I was mulling them around in my head for a while (while I was not working very much on anything else).

The current rules follow:

Cook the Books:
Two companies try to cook their books to improve their perceived values and attract investors. Auditors try to catch them at it.

2-12 players

Job cards (unless noted, job cards are played face down):
All job cards have a company. Half of them are company A and the other half are company B
Auditor: You can play any card including audit cards. You win if you catch either company cooking the books twice.
Accountant: You can play any card except for audit cards. You win if your company cooks the books without getting caught three times. (In case of a tie, you have to cook the books once more than the other company did.)
Hippie Accountant: You are an Accountant, however no-one suspects you of secretly being an auditor. Play with your job card face up. You win like any other accountant does.

Job card decks:
2 players:  1 auditor A, 2 Accountants A
3 players: 2 auditors (1a, 1b), 2 Accountants (1a, 1b)
4 players: 2 auditors (1a, 1b), 2 Accountants (1a, 1b)
5 players: 2 auditors (1a, 1b), 2 Accountants (1a, 1b), 2 hippie accountants (1a, 1b)
6 players: 2 auditors (1a, 1b), 4 Accountants (2a, 2b)
7 players: 2 auditors (1a, 1b), 4 Accountants (2a, 2b), 2 hippie accountants (1a, 1b)
8 players: 2 auditors (1a, 1b), 6 Accountants (3a, 3b)
9 players: 2 auditors (1a, 1b), 6 Accountants (3a, 3b), 2 hippie accountants (1a, 1b)
10 players: 2 auditors (1a, 1b), 8 Accountants (4a, 4b), 2 hippie accountants (1a, 1b)

With 3 or fewer players, one card is removed from the remaining cards, placed face down, and never looked at. The remaining cards are dealt out (one to each player).

With more than three players, divide the cards into their respective companys. Shuffle the cards. If hippie accountants are in the game, place them on the bottom of the decks face up.

Players may pick a card from the company of their choice, but the companys must end up as evenly as possible.

After companys are decided, All players look down and the auditors identify themselves to each other.

Action Phase:
Each player plays one action card face down in the middle. Once all of the cards are played, the players shuffle them and then reveal what happened. The remaining action cards are shuffled in as well, and the cards are returned to their respective owners.

Action cards:
n/2 each of:
Play fair A: You don't do anything illegal this turn. Gain no points.
Cook books A: You do something illegal this turn. Your company gains 1 point unless an Audit A card is played this turn. Your company may only gain 1 point per cooking books per turn.
Audit A: Company A is audited this turn. If any member of Company A played a 'Cook books' card this turn then company A is under disciplinary action and will lose the game if they are caught cooking the books by an audit again.
Play fair B: Same as above except with B
Cook books B: Same as above except with B
Audit B: Same as above except with B

In three player games or less everyone gets two sets of action cards. This allows auditors to audit either company freely. You may not play a card pertaining to the other company unless you are an auditor.

Auditors who audit a company and do not find any illegal activities two times in a row are forced to stop auditing that company for the remainder of the game. They may still vote to stop people from playing. Any illegal activities that are discovered by an audit reset this count.

Only auditors may audit. Any non auditor who audits loses and causes the auditors to win.

Vote phase:
After the first action phase there is a vote phase. Each player considers who they would like to be unable to play the next round. When any player is prepared to vote they raise their hand. Once all players have their hand up they simultaneously point to the player that they want to not act. All players tied for the most votes may not play actions in the next action phase.

If you are an accountant:

  • Voting out yourself is a bad idea.
  • Voting out your auditor is a good idea.
  • Voting out an opponents non-auditor is a slightly good idea.
  • Voting out the opponents auditor is a bad idea.
  • Voting out your own non auditor team mate is a bad idea.

If you are an auditor:

  • Voting out yourself is a bad idea.
  • Voting out an opponents non-auditor is a slightly good idea.
  • Voting out the other auditor is a bad idea unless the votes are tied and both of you would be unable to act next turn unless one voted on the other.
  • Voting out your own non auditor team mate is good idea if you can make the other people in your company think that the person is an auditor.
Win conditions:
If a company has three or more points and is the company with the most points then they win. The auditors and the other company loses.
If the auditors catch a company under disciplinary action cooking the books then the auditors and the other company wins.

We played three games at work today. It ended up fairly fun.